Trick or Treat

Today was the second Scratch session with a 3rd grade math class and it was a blast.  Last week I introduced Scratch to them and they also tried out the Etch-a-sketch project from Simon Haughton’s Scratch Progamming lessons.   Some of them spent some time during the week playing with Scratch during free time in math class.

This week I wanted to introduce the “ask and answer” blocks and “if-then-else” so I came up with this Trick or Treat lesson, just in time for Halloween.

First I verbally asked them “Trick or Treat?” Most of them said, “treat” of course.  Then we brainstormed what a “treat” would look like in Scratch – do something (animation), change the costume, say something, play a sound.  They of course had big ideas like candy falling from the sky or the Sprite eating a pile of candy.  I tried to translate that into more programable language.  Then we brainstormed what a “trick” would look like.

I showed them my sample project where a ghost asks “Trick or Treat” and if you say “treat” he turns into a bowl of cheesepuffs otherwise he turns into a scary ghost.  I also had different sounds and a bit of animation (the Sprite turns and grows).

Next it was their turn. I directed them to picked a background for the stage and a Sprite.  Their choice.  We had a lot of ghost and ghouls, but quite a variety of backgrounds.

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 9.25.50 PM

Then they asked the question “Trick or Treat?” and set up the answer to equal trick or treat.  Also their choice.Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 9.28.58 PM

We tested it and they noted it didn’t do anything. Well, not yet.  So we added a “say” block for each condition depending on if what they were looking for, trick or treat, and the opposite in the else clause.

Then I had them add two sounds, one for each condition.  In hindsight, I should have saved the sounds for last as noise level went up both from excitement and the random sounds playing in the room.

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 9.08.07 PM

Finally we added some costumes to the Sprite, one for each condition.  (There was a bit of confusion here because we weren’t adding more Sprites but costumes to our Sprite.)

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 9.41.58 PM

That was it, with just enough time to share their work. Their math teacher suggested this and it turned out to be a great idea. The projects were saved in a shared directory and all the laptops were closed and I displayed each project up on the screen for all to enjoy.  When it was their turn, I asked the project creator if they wanted me to answer “trick” or “treat” first, then played both cases for all their classmates to see. Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 9.21.32 PM

I’m very pleased with how this project went with this group of 3rd graders.  I would definitely do it again- just have them add sound last.

Like a Dream

I taught so many hours of code yesterday that I dreamed in code.  (It was the only way to move in my dream.  Thanks Anna & Elsa.)

Code.org puzzle with Frozen characters

Code.org puzzle with Frozen characters

But it was an awesome day.  Three classes of Hour of Code 2014 activities from Code.org, Tynker, & Code Kingdoms for 2nd and 4th graders plus two classes of Scratch and then Code Club after school.  A few 4th graders were with me for couple of these hours, too. I wonder if they dreamed about coding too?

For Computer Science Education Week, or “Hour of Code” week, I had the 4th grade math group I work with write math games in Scratch.  The project idea comes from the Scratch resources on Computers for Creativity‘s website.  The students were paired up and given two math periods to work on the project.   I showed them the two math games that students had made last year:

4th grade math quiz game in Scratch, 2013

4th grade math quiz game in Scratch, 2013

Screen Shot 2014-12-11 at 8.28.20 PM

4th grade math quiz game in Scratch, 2013

I handed out a one page project outline form and a print out of the guidelines to each pair.

Math Scratch Project Outline – Google Docs

With not very much time to work on it, I warned them to keep the project simple.  Get the game working with one math question, then build on it. I also made sure there was a Code Club member in each pairing, so at least one person had some knowledge of Scratch. I then I let them go.

I set their teacher up on Scratch online and he started a math game himself.  That was Monday.  Yesterday my plan was to have them finish up. My friend and co-worker in this class suggested they might need more time.  She had gone home and tried to make a Scratch math game and had some questions.  (How cool it that?  I’ll have to give both adults their “Hour of Code” certificate.)  But it is true,  I did give the students a big, creative project and only a little bit of time to do it.  From what I saw on Monday, only a couple of pairs were making their game too complicated and or not working well together.  We decided to conference with the each pair during the period to see if they had questions, needed feedback and as a general check-in to see if they were going to make the deadline.  First, though, the students “conferenced” and helped their teacher with his math game.

By the end of math on Wednesday, most of the groups were very close to having a working game.  We decided another half period might be warranted.  Then we’ll share them and try them out.

I heard one student say this coding stuff was great and he wanted to sign up for the next round of Code Club.

Oh, yeah, Code Club was great too. Everyone busy working on their own games.  Recording their voices.  Being successful, or at least satisfied, in drawing their sprites and backgrounds. I really enjoy troubleshooting Scratch projects and seeing all the creative and interesting ideas these 4th graders have.  My volunteers are really great, too.