Scratch Teacher Accounts

I’m testing out the new Scratch Teacher Account option with the 3rd grade math class that I am working with.

screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-9-32-07-pm

The class is using Chromebooks so using Scratch 2.0 offline editor was not an option this time. Luckily I knew that Scratch was offering teacher accounts – I was there when they announced it at the Scratch@MIT Conference 2016.

It wasn’t difficult to set up my teacher account. After I was approved, I had to come up with 20 student account names. I wanted ones that had an easy pattern, were easy to spell, remember and would not identify the students in any way.  I chose a “color-Sprite name” pattern, for example “bluegobo”.

Once I had all 20 accounts set up in my class, I printed out the account names, cut them apart, put them in a jar and had the students draw a random one out.  I have recorded their names & account names together in case someone forgets, and for grading.

After we got logged into the Chromebooks and into their accounts, we started with some of the lessons I did last year with 3rd graders (see 3rd Grade Scratch Game Makers).  I introduced drawing their initial with glides on the coordinate grid earlier than last year and they struggled with both their unfamiliarity with the program and with coordinate grids. I was somewhat disappointed with how the lesson went. I did more troubleshooting than I expected. After the hour lesson as over, I thought I would be able to see their projects but I realize now that I can only see projects they share.  I didn’t think we got far enough in the coordinate grid project to have time to talk about sharing their projects.

I missed a week, but their math teacher had them work in their Scratch accounts even with me not there. She had them create a Halloween scene and said she was impressed that they were able log in and to make the Sprites move around.  I’m impressed that she had them do Scratch without me. But it was a perfect segue into our Trick or Treat lesson on decisions in programming.

This time I remembered to save enough time for them to share and show their projects.

I know some of them didn’t feel they had enough time. But everyone enjoyed seeing their project playing out on the front board.

Note: no one noticed (that I heard) that what you type in has to exactly equal the answer for the “if” part to work.

 

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